Archive for June, 2012


*** Make Every Day, Earth Day****

Today-Wednesday..June 27, 2012-> It was 57 degrees, breezy and partly cloudy at 0630.  Beach cams show little surf and a stiff NW breeze is forecast. It’s a  good day to do a little yard work. Perhaps later in the day when the wind slackens I might visit a small local pond  that I haven’t fished in forty years just  to see what’s there.   

Yesterday-Tuesday..June 26,2012->> At 2:00  P.M.it’s  cloudy and 74 deg. This morn it  was 68 deg and sunny when I grabbed my saltwater gear and headed out to try a few hours of striper fishing along the rocks with “Al the Guide.”. Upon arrival it was sunny with a few puffy clouds and 70 deg. There was a  slight westerly  breeze ,  gentle surf and little white water, far from the best fishing conditions.  I managed only two hits in an hour or so, however,  they were good ones.   The first hit resulted in having a nice size  striper on only briefly and then the leader parted up near the connection to the fly line. I attribute this to becoming overly frayed during  earlier battles with several large barnacle encrusted boulders that grabbed my Yellow Rebel. If you manage to catch a twenty pound striper that is trailing six feet of Big Game Green 20 lb. mono and has a Yellow Rebel fly stuck in it’s jaw, pat him on the head for me as you release it. The second strike resulted in battling and finally landing a decent striper that took a Bondorew Bucktail.

The beauty part of this morning’s fishing is that I had a clear broadside view of each fish coming up and talking the fly. Each fish rose up out of no where into the approaching breaker and intercepted the fly as it was being sucked back out into the curl of the wave. The visual part of fly fishing is important to me and makes it more enjoyable. Yes night time fishing is good  and is probably more productive than daytime outings. However, because of the limited visual aspect of it I prefer daytime fishing. I like to watch the breakers and see how the water sets up after they fall. Seeing a striper in the curl of a wave or watching baitfish greyhound across the surface to avoid be eaten is exciting to watch. Of course watching the backs and tails of a school of stripers porpoising  as they chase bait in a good white water wash will always stir me up and is not soon forgotten. As much as I like daytime fishing I guess anytime you can get out is good.

 

 Monday.. June 25, 2012.->>It’s currently 70 deg and cloudy. There’s  numerous strong thunderstorms passing  across southern New England today and it looks to be a bad day to be on the water.

Sunday.. June 24, 2012.->>It’s currently 70 deg and sunny. Sunny today and rainy tomorrow.

Here’s a fishing report from Al “The Guide” sent to me this morning while he was at Narragansett Town Beach–fish are there:–>>” N beach this  morn at 7am. 5 -10 surf casters on beach Bass in 6′ of water looking like subs No surf boyes hooking up.Bass cruzzing in pods of 5-10 fish an some single bigs. Could be crabs or tiny sandeels. To dangerous to cast off the wall at beach to many peeps going to the beach. Fun watching the boyes casting to the fish that are clearly visiable but un coperative.One long rodder 3am to 7am no takes no nothing?????”— So now you know–go and Catch’em up!

Saturday..June 23, 2012 & Today- Sunday.. June 24, 2012.->> Temps in the low 80s  with a chance of a thunderstorm today and mostly sunny weather for tomorrow. My trusty weather station isn’t forecasting much as a nearby lightning strike yesterday may have fried it.  Today, I plan on straightening up my garden then  try to figure out what’s up with my weather station.

-Friday..June 22, 2012-> I decided to try some “spider fishing” locally for warmwater species. Spider fishing is what I call top water fishing using small foam beetles and bugs.

I enjoy this type of fly fishing.  It’s a fun and productive way to fly fish, plus a very good way to introduce a youngster to fly fishing. Spider fishing was how I taught my son to fly fish. Someone once told me that “Real men fish for big fish and only boys fish for small fish.”  I’m glad I still have some boy in me. Surprisingly, yesterday the smallies weren’t interested in my spiders only bluegill were. The smallies did however take a No. 10 Muddler fished just below the surface. Later in the day several intense thunderstorms passed by. These were nasty storms with gusty winds, heavy rain, and pea size hail. The once nice and upright vegetable plants in my garden are now partly shredded and flattened–oh well. We had an inch of rain in about 20 mins. Needless to say, the bird baths are filled.

Thursday..June 21, 2012-> It was 75 degrees at 0630 this morn. Gonna be a hot one with temps forecast in the upper 90s. My trusty weather station is forecasting showers within the next 24 hours. Good day to just take it slow and easy.  Yesterday -Wednesday.. June 20, 2012-> The temp reached 96 at the backyard bird bath. I went out mid-morning to try a local river for a few minutes and caught a smallmouth and a foot long rainbow trout. At noon I grabbed my saltwater gear and headed to the shores of Narragansett bay.  Figured if I waded in shorts and wore a mesh hat I could contend with the blazing sun and mid 90s temps. The tide was right and  I knew there were many keepers in the area I wanted to try and  was I right.  I landed a bunch of keepers but earned every one of them . Here’s a pic of yesterday’s catch while  I waded the shoreline.

 

Tuesday.. June 19, 2012-> Put my boat in to see if a “Crab Hatch” was occurring. Didn’t see any evidence of it although the wind picked up early and made  seeing any rising stripers difficult. I fished with my friend “Al the Guide”. We found there were a few bluefish around  along with several schoolies. The bluefish ranged from 2-7 lbs. While they can destroy tackle, it’s always fun to catch a few bluefish. I took a bluefish home figuring to brine then smoke it.  Once home I decided it best to grill it and feed it to my dogs, especially Maddie the “Wonder Dog.”  Maddie likes bluefish, raw or cooked.  Maddie will eat anything except cucumbers and lettuce, all else is fair game.

Monday…June 18, 2012->> It’s 55 deg and partly cloudy this morn at the backyard bird bath this morn. My trusty weather gauge is forecasting sunny weather ahead. As mentioned earlier I went to fish Willis Pd. in Sudbury MA  with several of the Basspond.com forum members. This “little known” pond was said to have good bass fishing. Well more people turned out to fish this “secret” pond than they had voter turnout in the last presidential election. It was the area’s annual Father’s Day Bass Fishing Tournament.  Fishing was slow to say the least. I attributed it to the poor visibility of only about 1.5 ft.. This meant the fish would have to be hit on the noggin to see the fly. Perhaps this is why there’s good  fishing after dark here when noisy topwater lures rule and the bass key in on sound and not sight. Anyways a good time was had by all. Good food and a million laughs. While we ate much of the entertainment was provided by a  local area nine-year old Yellow Lab named ”  Jessie.”  Jessie  was like a buzz saw. A non-stop bundle of energy running about in and out of the water like he was possessed. First dog I’ve ever met that would rather be in the water retrieving a stick then gnawing on several nice steaks bones that were  made available to him.

***This week I hope to update the current Saltwater Fly of the Month with Al’s “Guide Fly.” ***

Saturday..June 16, 2012 &   Yesterday>Father’s day- Sunday.. June 17, 2012.->> Temps in  the 70s with  some sun & partly cloudy weather is  forecast for this weekend.  Good weekend to be outdoors and perhaps spend it with your Dad. Today I’m heading up to Willis Pond in Sudbury, MA  and spend the day fishing and BBQing  some steaks with a great bunch of guys from the Basspond.com forum. Good friends, fishing and food, what’s better than that?  Put my boat in this past Thursday to look for the crab hatch. Bad choice,  as strong NE winds makes fishing tough in small aluminum boat especially on the SW side of Narragansett Bay. Managed a few schoolies but what I saw mostly was salt spray coming over the guwales and in my face.

Monday…June 11, 2012->> It’s in the 70s and sunny. Sun is forecast for this afternoon and early tomorrow then clouding up in the afternoon. Good time to finish my veggie garden and get my boat ready so I can try the anticipated “Crab Hatch.” Tried to do that yesterday but ended up cutting down an apple tree instead.

Saturday..June 9, 2012 & Tomorrow-Sunday.. June 10, 2012.->> It’s in the 70s and cloudy today, some sun is forecast for this afternoon and tomorrow. Good time to finish my veggie garden and get my boat ready so I can try the anticipated “Crab Hatch.” However there’s birthday and graduation paarties to attend first, then do the other stuff.  If you’re interested in the “Crab Hatch” and Squeteague then check out this link it’s got some interesting info.

Friday..June 8, 2012->>Looks like a carbon copy of yesterday. It’s 54 degrees, calm and slightly foggy.  Bird bath’s still full and my trusty?? weather stations says the barometer’s steady and  still insists it’s going to be sunny within 24 hrs.

Thursday..June 7, 2012-> It’s 54 degrees, calm and slightly foggy.  Bird bath’s still full and my trusty?? weather stations says the barometer’s steady and  still insists it’s going to be sunny within 24 hrs. Might try a few hours of striper fishing this morn–we’ll see.

Wednesday..June 6, 2012-> It’s 57 degrees, fairly calm and cloudy. The bird bath remains full because of the very moist air as .of late. My trusty weather station says the barometer’s steady and it’s still insisting to forecast sunny weather for it’s 24 hr forecast.

*** Crab Hatch  article now Posted on this sites Saltwater Page. ***

***Monthly/Fiishing Report page has been Updated with a Fishing In June post. A revision to it noting the “Crab Hatch” and several suggested spots for the month are now included. ***

Tuesday..June 5, 2012-> It’s 52 degrees, calm and cloudy. The bird bath remains full after being topped off with 0.3″ of rain yesterday . My trusty weather station says the barometer’s steady and it ‘s 24 hr forecast is for sunny??? weather. I tapped it, dropped it, jumped up/down on it , and changed the batteries but it insists that there’ll be sunny weather within 24 hrs.

Monday..June 4, 2012-> It’s 53 raw degrees and showesy. The bird bath’s full from 0.6″ of rain yesterday . My trusty weather station says the baometer’s steady and it’s 24 hr forecast is for showers.

Saturday..June 2nd & Sunday..June 3, 2012>temps in the 60s, breezy and showery weather Saturday and today it’s sunny, breezy and near mid 60s deg. at the bird bath. The bird bath is full up as we had 1.4 in. iof rain yesterday. It may be sunny right now but my trusty weather station shows a steady barometer and is forecasting showers within the next 24 hrs.

****Friday..June 1, 2012->It’s 67 deg. , clear and dry this morn at the backyard bird bath. The barometer’s steady and my trusty weather station’s forecasting sunny weather. No fishing today but I did go out yesterday.

My lifelong friend Al Tobojka of South Kingston, R.I. fishes regularly for a few hours most days. Affectionately known to his friends as “Al the Guide”, Al lives about a stones throw from the Narragansett, RI shoreline so he’s aware of where the fish are or at least where they’ve been. Narragansett isn’t the only location he tries but can be found anywhere from Sakonnet Pt. to Watch Hill, R.I. I am often privy to much of this information. On Tuesday and Wednesday of this week Al caught nearly two dozen stripers up to 26”. He found them taking some very small worm like critters , about ¾” long. The worm patterns he carried were too long and he couldn’t get a taker. Al went back to his car and found a box of trout flies. In his box he found a #10 BH Brown Crystal Bugger. He tied it on and returned to back to fishing. The pattern was an instant success. After many broken and straightened freshwater hooks he was out of the Buggers so he tried a #12 Muddler Minnow and was once again back in business. “The Guide” likes to take video while landing fish. Rod in one hand and camera in the other makes for some interesting video clips. To send me a report (or to rub it in) Al sent me a Flip Video of one of his stripers being landed with the Brown Crystal Bugger firmly sunk into the corner of its mouth. Next day he returned with a small worm pattern he tied up the night before consisting of a Black Marabou tail and a Brown Chenille body and several turns of peacock herl for a head. Nothing fancy but a number of stripers seemed to fancy his creation. I went with him yesterday to try my hand at his fishery. The fish were less active and a bit choosy and we only managed a handful of bass and a hickory shad. I used a small worm pattern I had tied up the night before. It was a simple tie of a dark olive marabou tail , body of pearl root beer Estaz trimmed short and peacock herl head. So much for fancy worm patterns and neither of them have names.. I recently came upon a website with a page of nearly two dozen worm patterns with all sorts of names, some quite fancy. I sent Al the link to which he replied: “You’d really have to spend a lot of time coming up with some of those names, they probably spend more time trying to name their fly patterns than they do in naming their children.” Words of Wisdom from “The Guide.”

For those of you who are into worm patterns here’s a pic of Al’s Brown Chenille worm and my Root Beer Estaz pattern that we used’ .**(Click on Pic to enlarge)**

*** Al’s “Guide Fly” will be featured as the upcoming “Fly of the Month.” These are flies that Al uses daily when the worm hatches are history and the silversides are spread out after spawning. It’s then time to get down to business. Business that’s conducted only during daylight hours not in the dark of night.

The Crab Hatch

                During  May and into early June as water temperatures rise Clam Worm hatches take the spotlight. Many fly rodders seek out worm hatches and the often spectacular striper fishing they bring. I’m not one who looks forward to or tries to figure out where or when worms will emerge or “hatch” as they say. If it happens when I’m fishing , great  I’ll surely  try my worm patterns.   I don’t however go out of my way to find them.  However,  there  is one  hatch I look forward to each year in mid- June. It’s the little known and seldom talked about “Crab Hatch.”

                Here in Narragansett Bay R.I. around mid-June  tiny crabs begin to appear scattered  all about the surface . With each passing day more and more appear until  eventually toward month’s end there’s  a Bi-zillion of them throughout the bay.  Also with each passing day more of them become drawn into the main current areas  and are less scattered, Striped bass favor them just as they do worms hatches. Schools of stripers can be seen swimming leisurely about sipping these tiny crustaceans from just below the surface. Stripers feeding on these small crabs are just as selective as when they’re on worms, in fact  I believe even more so or so it seems. These small crustaceans are slightly smaller than your small finger nail. Trying to imitate these small crustaceans with fur and feathers is difficult to say the least. I don’t even try to mimic them. However this year I have ideas for a pattern I think will work. Tying it up will be the easy part. Having the patience to fish it , well that’s going to be the hard part. Unlike clam worms that zip about all over the place, the crabs seem to flounder about and drift with the current. They appear almost lifeless but a close look will reveal their little legs paddling away a mile a minute as they drift along.  Just drifting a fly the size of a No.10 freshwater nymph pattern would take some doing and patience.

                It takes some really calm days to realize what’s going on. By calm, I mean a flat surface w/ relatively little or no wind to cause small wavelets. The glassier the better as any amount of chop makes seeing the rising bass nearly impossible. Stripers feeding on crabs are usually in pods or small schools. They swim slowly about, usually a foot or so below the surface and rise up toward the surface to take the helpless crabs drifting about. They behave much like freshwater trout making a “ bulging rise.” Despite their intensely selective feeding while on crabs, I’ve found they can be taken on streamer flies. It just takes lots and lots of patience.  I call stripers feeding on crabs to be fish of “countless casts.”  This is because you can make what seems like hundreds of casts to them and not even get a chase never mind a strike. Then suddenly, an arm wrenching strike and it’s fish on. While their mindset is only on the tiny crabs there’s always a few stripers in the pack that decide the heck with the popcorn I’m grabbing the prime rib. These fish are usually well worth the time spent, as they’re normally some really  good ones. My fly of choice for this is without hesitation is a 5-6” long Bondorew Bucktail.  I usually take my time and look things over and try and figure the striper’s speed and line of travel. I then cast to try and  put the fly just above their line of travel so it passes just in front of the bass on the retrieve. The stripers are so absorbed in feeding on crabs that little seems to bother them. However, an errant cast directly over them will surely spook them.  Once spooked they’ll quickly return to to the surface  feeding again but it’s usually out of reach and requires repositioning or waiting till they return to be in within casting range.

                Fishing from a boat is surely best but they’re close enough to shore to make fishing near shore from a canoe or kayak possible. However they often come within reach of the shore angler at certain locations. Regardless of boat, kayak or shore fishing the key is finding the stripers. Take the time to slowly and carefully scan the water for the slightest sign feeding stripers. A quick once over won’t do, only carefull observation will.   I believe that this hatch is not localized to just Rhode island but probably occurs all along from Buzzards Bay, MA   down  to the eastern end  Connecticut.  For those of you from R.I.  I’ll list some spots where I’ve taken stripers from shore during the crab hatch in the next few days so check back again. I might even have my simple tiny crab fly tied and will post some pics of it.  I will try fishing it t but I don’t think I’ll keep it on that long.  So check back soon for updates to this ”Crab Hatch”post—Ray

© R.J. Bondorew June 2012

*** Make Every Day, Earth Day****

Today-Wednesday..June 6, 2012-> It’s 57 degrees, fairly calm  and cloudy. The bird bath remains full because of the very moist air as of late. My trusty weather station says the barometer’s steady and it’s  still insisting to forecast sunny weather for it’s 24 hr forecast.

***Monthly/Fiishing Report page has been Updated with a Fishing In June post. A revision to it  noting  the “Crab Hatch”  and several suggested spots for the month are now included. A seperate article about the “Crab Hatch” will be posted later today on my sites Saltwater Page. So keep checking back.–Ray****

Yesterday-Tuesday..June 5, 2012-> It’s 52 degrees, calm and cloudy.   The bird bath remains full after being topped off with 0.3″ of rain yesterday . My trusty weather station says the barometer’s steady and it ‘s 24 hr forecast is for sunny??? weather.  I tapped it, dropped it, jumped up/down on it , and changed the batteries but it insists that there’ll be sunny weather within 24 hrs.

 

Monday..June 4, 2012-> It’s 53 raw degrees and showesy. The bird bath’s full from 0.6″ of rain yesterday . My trusty weather station says the baometer’s steady and it’s 24 hr forecast is for showers.

Saturday..June 2nd &  Sunday..June 3, 2012>temps in the 60s, breezy and showery weather Saturday and today it’s sunny, breezy and near mid 60s deg. at the bird bath. The bird bath is full up as we had 1.4 in. iof rain yesterday. It may be sunny right now but my trusty weather station shows a steady barometer and is forecasting showers within the next 24 hrs.

****Friday..June 1, 2012->It’s 67 deg. , clear and dry this morn at the backyard bird bath. The barometer’s steady and my trusty weather station’s forecasting sunny weather. No fishing today but I did go out yesterday.

My lifelong friend Al Tobojka of South Kingston, R.I. fishes regularly for a few hours most days. Affectionately known to his friends as “Al the Guide”, Al lives about a stones throw from the Narragansett, RI shoreline so he’s aware of where the fish are or at least where they’ve been. Narragansett isn’t the only location he tries but can be found anywhere from Sakonnet Pt. to Watch Hill, R.I. I am often privy to much of this information. On Tuesday and Wednesday of this week Al caught nearly two dozen stripers up to 26”. He found them taking some very small worm like critters , about ¾” long. The worm patterns he carried were too long and he couldn’t get a taker. Al went back to his car and found a box of trout flies. In his box he found a #10 BH Brown Crystal Bugger. He tied it on and returned to back to fishing. The pattern was an instant success. After many broken and straightened freshwater hooks he was out of the Buggers so he tried a #12 Muddler Minnow and was once again back in business. “The Guide” likes to take video while landing fish. Rod in one hand and camera in the other makes for some interesting video clips. To send me a report (or to rub it in) Al sent me a Flip Video of one of his stripers being landed with the Brown Crystal Bugger firmly sunk into the corner of its mouth. Next day he returned with a small worm pattern he tied up the night before consisting of a Black Marabou tail and a Brown Chenille body and several turns of peacock herl for a head. Nothing fancy but a number of stripers seemed to fancy his creation. I went with him yesterday to try my hand at his fishery. The fish were less active and a bit choosy and we only managed a handful of bass and a hickory shad. I used a small worm pattern I had tied up the night before. It was a simple tie of a dark olive marabou tail , body of pearl root beer Estaz trimmed short and peacock herl head. So much for fancy worm patterns and neither of them have names.. I recently came upon a website with a page of nearly two dozen worm patterns with all sorts of names, some quite fancy. I sent Al the link to which he replied: “You’d really have to spend a lot of time coming up with some of those names, they probably spend more time trying to name their fly patterns than they do in naming their children.” Words of Wisdom from “The Guide.”

For those of you who are into worm patterns here’s a pic of Al’s Brown Chenille worm and my Root Beer Estaz pattern that we used’ .**(Click on Pic to enlarge)**

*** Al’s “Guide Fly” will be featured as the upcoming “Fly of the Month.” These are flies that Al uses daily when the worm hatches are history and the silversides are spread out after spawning. It’s then time to get down to business. Business that’s conducted only during daylight hours not in the dark of night.

Fishing in June      

                June is the month when many species of birds and fish propagate their own kind.  Water and air temperatures will continue to rise as well as the quality of fishing.  Fishing conditions will be pleasant and the longer days give the angler more daylight time on the water.

Trout fishing during June should be excellent, only the dedicated trout fishermen remain and numerous daytime and evening hatches will occur.   The most noted of these hatches is the largest of mayflies, the Hexagenia.  The “Hex” hatch will start on the  Wood River here in Rhode Island around the third week of the month and continue on into July.  The hatch will come off in slow water stretches just before dusk and continue well into the darkness of night.  White Wulffs, White Millers and even popping bugs will take fish when the fish go on a feeding frenzy during this hatch.  These insects are large and imitations should be tied on about a No. 6-8 hook.  If you plan on trying this fishing into the dark of night it may be best to get situated in your spot prior to nightfall. Getting a feel for where obstacles are, where and how far you can cast without getting into trees and bushes is time well. Total darkness is not a good setting to learn the area. Small and largemouth bass will have spawned in May and will be heading into deeper water.  Of course, most of Rhode Island’s lakes and ponds are man-made basins which are shallow and don’t offer much variation in depth. The pond and lakes that are of natural basin do offer a greater variation in depth and structure. Numerous members of the Sunfish family will be on their beds during the month. They are readily visible from shore and can be seen in the shallows guarding their nests.  These aggressive and scrappy pinfish put up a good fight for their size and offers  excellent  chances to introduce a youngster to fly fishing using small popping bugs or dry flies. It should be noted that the bigger Bluegills and Sunfish nest in 4-6’ of water.

Down on the salt, it is business as usual for Mother Nature.  The tidal rivers and estuaries which seemed so barren just a few weeks ago are now bustling nurseries.   Most of their inhabitants will be in the reproductive cycle during the month.  A lot of this activity will go unnoticed while some of it will be clearly evident.  Large schools of silversid3es can be seen along grassy areas, sometimes in such numbers that the milt from the males will turn the water milky.  Striped bass take full advantage of this by charging into the discolored area and slashing into this preoccupied baitfish.  Clam worms can be seen streaking around near the surface afte4r dark during their mating ritual.  These one and one half to two inch “tracer bullets” swim about doing figure eights and dipsy doodles and draw the attention of striped bass at this time.  During the height of the “hatch”, stripers may selectively feed only on clam worms.  Horseshoe crabs will also mate during this time.  These fierce looking, prehistoric creatures move about the bottom like motorized armored tanks without a guidance system.  They can be felt banging into your boots while attempting to mate with their own kind or your boots.  In areas where they are heavily concentrated it is best to drag your feet while wading in order to avoid tripping over them.  While bass are gorging themselves on clam worms and silversides, bluefish will be entering our area in large numbers.  They will continue to live up to their reputation of chomping on anything less than twice their size.  Bluefish have been on the decline in recent years and the cause of this is uncertain. Let’s hope it’s a cyclic thing and not overfishing or disease.  Nothing wrong with an occasional big “Chopper” Bluefish to make sure you’ve got your act and tackle together.  In years gone by June was the month to get some nice Squeteague(Weakfish.) Locally, East Greenwich Bay, R.I. was perhaps the best area. They could be caught at all hours of the day. Often times feeding near or on the surface taking shrimp and anything else that was passing by. My favorite fly for them then was the simple Yellow Brooks’ Blond. Unfortunately, the “Tide Runners” have been scarce for many years now. My last Squeteague was six years ago in early September when for some unknown reason a bunch of 4-6 lbers spent several weeks in a local harbor. This time they were near the bottom and a Chartreuse/White Clouser w/ gold flashabou and a Yellow/White Clouser worked well. There’s another type of fishing that occurs for several weeks in June and that’s the crab hatch. The crab hatch is very similar in most respects with the worm hatch. It’s a  fishery that seems  little known and seldom talked about. I’m currently writing a piece on the “Crab Hatch” and plan on posting it soon on this  site’s Saltwater page so check it frequently.

June offers something for everyone, fresh and saltwater alike. The fishing is peaking, weather is pleasant and the days are longer. It’s a great time of year to try it all.

(c) Ray Bondorew June 2012

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

***  In June  I might be inclined to try:****

Early June –Rome pt./Hamilton No.Kingstown, RI

“              “     Bristol  Narrows, Bristol, Ri

June 2nd & 3rd weeks Narragansett town Beach /Dunes club –evening tides, 3 Hr +/- hi tide

Father’s Day to end of June>  Bass Rock/Black Pt & rocks North of Narrow River, Narragansett RI

Taylor Pt, Jamestown R.I. Third week crab hatch out going tides—shore or kayak

 

*** Make Every Day, Earth Day****

Yesterday–Saturday..June 2nd & Today -Sunday..June 3, 2012>temps in the 60s, breezy and showery weather Saturday and today it’s sunny, breezy and near mid 60s deg. at the bird bath. The bird bath is full up as we had  1.4 in. of rain yesterday.   It may be sunny right now but my trusty weather station shows a steady barometer and is forecasting showers within the next 24 hrs.

 ****Monthly/Fishing Report  page  has been Updated with a Fishing In June post.  A revision to it will be made tomorrow.***

 

Friday..June 1, 2012->It’s 67 deg. , clear and dry this morn at the backyard bird bath. The barometer’s steady and my trusty weather station’s forecasting sunny weather. No fishing today but I did go out yesterday.

My lifelong friend Al Tobojka of South Kingston, R.I. fishes regularly for a few hours most days. Affectionately known to his friends as “Al the Guide”, Al lives about a stones throw from the Narragansett, RI shoreline so he’s aware of where the fish are or at least where they’ve been. Narragansett isn’t the only location he tries but can be found anywhere from Sakonnet Pt. to Watch Hill, R.I. I am often privy to much of this information. On Tuesday and Wednesday of this week Al caught nearly two dozen stripers up to 26”. He found them taking some very small worm like critters , about ¾” long. The worm patterns he carried were too long and he couldn’t get a taker. Al went back to his car and found a box of trout flies. In his box he found a #10 BH Brown Crystal Bugger. He tied it on and returned to back to fishing. The pattern was an instant success. After many broken and straightened freshwater hooks he was out of the Buggers so he tried a #12 Muddler Minnow and was once again back in business. “The Guide” likes to take video while landing fish. Rod in one hand and camera in the other makes for some interesting video clips. To send me a report (or to rub it in) Al sent me a Flip Video of one of his stripers being landed with the Brown Crystal Bugger firmly sunk into the corner of its mouth. Next day he returned with a small worm pattern he tied up the night before consisting of a Black Marabou tail and a Brown Chenille body and several turns of peacock herl for a head. Nothing fancy but a number of stripers seemed to fancy his creation. I went with him yesterday to try my hand at his fishery. The fish were less active and a bit choosy and we only managed a handful of bass and a hickory shad. I used a small worm pattern I had tied up the night before. It was a simple tie of a dark olive marabou tail , body of pearl root beer Estaz trimmed short and peacock herl head. So much for fancy worm patterns and neither of them have names.. I recently came upon a website with a page of nearly two dozen worm patterns with all sorts of names, some quite fancy. I sent Al the link to which he replied: “You’d really have to spend a lot of time coming up with some of those names, they probably spend more time trying to name their fly patterns than they do in naming their children.” Words of Wisdom from “The Guide.”

For those of you who are into worm patterns here’s a pic of Al’s Brown Chenille worm and my Root Beer Estaz pattern that we used’ .**(Click on Pic to enlarge)**

*** Al’s “Guide Fly” will be featured as the upcoming “Fly of the Month.” These are flies that Al uses daily when the worm hatches are history and the silversides are spread out after spawning. It’s then time to get down to business.  Business that’s conducted only during daylight hours not in the dark of night.